"I am certainly not one of those who need to be prodded…"

08.23.09 gaborone

Posted in personal by stuart sia on August 29, 2009

I HAVE INTERNET, and its great. I finally gave in and signed up for wireless internet in Gabs and I am now officially connected to the rest of the world. That’s my big news for the week.

I’ve been in Gaborone for a week and a half now with the other Life Skills and NGO volunteers, and it’s been good. We went to a restaurant/bar/club called the Bull and the Bush last Saturday. I had an amazing calzone and danced until 1 am. Good times with good people.

It’s Tuesday and the counterpart component of the workshop has begun. My counterpart, Thuli, arrived last night and its been great catching up with her. Today we discussed our expectations of each other and what we hope for me to accomplish in these next couple years, and the discussion went well. My two-month assessment of Mogobane has given me a lot to think about, but I’m choosing to focus on a couple in which I can really make a difference.

To summarize some of the issues we face in Mogobane Community Junior Secondary School: low grades, low rate of promotion to secondary school, alcohol abuse, truancy, and teenage sexual activity.

IDEA 1:

The Life Skills Curriculum developed by the Ministry of Education aims to address such issues. And although the Guidance & Counseling Department of each school has been mandated to be the “vehicle” of this curriculum the Ministry of Education has been wise to acknowledge that Life Skills are neither measurable nor something that must necessarily be “taught.” That is to say, Life Skills (such as assertiveness, high self-esteem, confidence, interpersonal communication, etc) can and should be taught in a variety of settings; hence, the concept of “stream-lining” the curriculum.

The Ministry has now charged all teachers to implement and integrate the Life Skills Curriculum into the regular curriculum. I am a fan of the concept but a critic of its implementation.

In a nutshell, the teachers have the resources to integrate Life Skills into their individual curriculums. The issue, however, is that the resources are not easily accessible and many of the teachers aren’t actually trained on how to use those resources. And what I mean by “accessible” is not that the resources are not there, but that they are not easily utilized. As useful as an abstract discussion of Life Skills is to understanding the importance of Life Skills, it is less so for the teacher who must construct her or his lesson plan from scratch. How does an agriculture teacher promote assertiveness skills? How does a math teacher promote decision-making skills? Although not impossible, it is, admittedly, challenging.

I want to make it easier. The teachers at my school are stretched thin as it is, with 20 teachers filling the committees and the roles normally filled by 50 to 100 teachers in larger schools. Lesson planning is time consuming, and it is not always easy to be creative. If I can make the Life Skills resources provided by the Ministry more subject specific, I think the teachers are more likely to utilize them.

IDEA 2:

Most of what is learned in life is learned outside the classroom. While it is not a bad thing to address such issues in the classroom setting, it is negligent to not address such issues outside of it.

My school is small: it numbers about 200. The great thing about a small school is it offers more individualized attention and an intimacy lost in larger schools. However, this also comes with a poverty of resources and opportunities.

I want to give students opportunities to build their self-esteem, to develop interpersonal skills, to have their efforts and successes recognized, and to feel a sense of ownership of their school.

There is unfortunately a poverty of such opportunities in my school. In conducting appreciative interviews with several of the teachers, I tried to find out what sort of student clubs and activities our teachers have the knowledge, talent, and interest to run. And I would also like to find out the sort of clubs and activities the students themselves would like to see at their school. What I ultimately hope to establish is a variety of student-initiated, student-lead, and subsequently sustainable groups, whose activities are guided, recognized, and appreciated by teachers.

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